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ONCE A YEAR 1970s BRITISH FOLKLORE

SHROVE TUESDAY AND ASH WEDNESDAY<br />
Royal Shrovetide Football<br />
ASHBOURNE, DERBYSHIRE 1974<br />
<br />
Although Shrovetide football, a sort of rugby with a minimum of rules, has died out in many places in Britain,   The game is played on both days between the Up'ards, those born north of the Henmore, a stream which runs through the town, and those that were born on the south side, the Down'ards. The pitch is a no-man's land between two watermills at either end<br />
of the town, about two miles apart. The Up'ards' goal is the<br />
Struston Mill, and the Down'ards' the Clifton Mill, a goal being scored when the ball touches the spot where the watermill wheel used to be three times. A round ball is used, made of shoe leather cut into panels sewn together with wax thread, and stuffed with cork dust. The balls are made and painted in the town, the organizing committee ordering about three or four each year. The tradition has grown up that the design which is painted on the ball<br />
should be the crest of the man who throws the ball up, or some reference to his profession. The game starts at 2 p.m. after a traditional lunch at the Green Man Hotel. The ball is carried through the streets to Shawcroft, a field near the centre of the town, and after a few words of encouragement and a warning about causing damage, the assembled crowds sing' Auld Lang Syne' and the National Anthem. The ball is then thrown up to start the game. Much of the game is centred around the Henmore, and is played in a series of rugby-type scrummages known as 'Hugs'. Occasion-<br />
ally the ball breaks free. The almost total absence of rules does not exclude one important exception -- the use of cars to carry the ball is not allowed. Should a goal be scored before 5 p.m. a new ball is thrown up again from Shawcroft. In 1890 and again in 1967 records were made with three goals in one day's play. Although play continues now only until 10 p.m., up until the 1920s play carried on until midnight.
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SHROVE TUESDAY AND ASH WEDNESDAY Royal Shrovetide Football ASHBOURNE, DERBYSHIRE ARCHIVE PHOTOGRAPH
SHROVE TUESDAY AND ASH WEDNESDAY
Royal Shrovetide Football
ASHBOURNE, DERBYSHIRE 1974

Although Shrovetide football, a sort of rugby with a minimum of rules, has died out in many places in Britain, The game is played on both days between the Up'ards, those born north of the Henmore, a stream which runs through the town, and those that were born on the south side, the Down'ards. The pitch is a no-man's land between two watermills at either end
of the town,...
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Filename: SHROVE TUESDAY AND ASH WEDNESDAY Royal Shrovetide Football ASHBOURNE, DERBYSHIRE .jpg
Size: 5197x3450 / 8.9MB
From gallery: ONCE A YEAR 1970s BRITISH FOLKLORE
Source: Homer Sykes
Date:
Location: ASHBOURNE, DERBYSHIRE,
Credit: Homer Sykes
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Model Release: No
Property Release: No
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Keywords:
  • SHROVE TUESDAY
  • ASH WEDNESDAY
  • Royal Shrovetide Football
  • ASHBOURNE
  • DERBYSHIRE
  • FOOTBALL
  • traditional
  • game
  • sport
  • ENGLAND
  • BRITAIN
  • UK
  • BRITISH
  • ENGLISH
  • ARCHIVE STOCK
  • 1970s
  • 70s
  • Folklore
  • annual event
  • Folk custom
  • Ritual
  • My archive ref 24 723
  • 1974
  • SPECTATORS

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