Dicing for Maids Money<br />
GUILDFORD, SURREY. January, now takes place in May.<br />
<br />
Miss Ellen Dovey and Miss Doris Ayres dice for Maids Money. Miss Dovey won following a tie on the first throw. <br />
<br />
Guildford is fortunate in being the recipient of two benefactions. In his will,dated 29 January 1674, John How directed that the Mayor or magistrate of Guildford were to choose two poor servant-maids within the said town of good repute, who had served master or mistress two years together. They were to throw dice or cast lots as the mayor or magistrate directed. The maid with the highest score in a single throw was to be paid one year's clear profit of the premises so to be purchased.' For the purpose of buying premises he left £400  but by decree in chancery of 1728 the money was invested in South Sea Annuities and the interest ordered to be paid to the mayor. This is known as Maid's Money. To redress the balance in favour of the men, in an equally curious will of 3 July 1702, John Parson created Apprentices' Money. In his will he left £600 to the corporation of the town of Guildford to be disposed of by the mayor and magistrate of the town and the interest to be given annually to an apprentice. He stated that 'it should be given to a poor young man, who hath served an apprenticeship of seven years in the same town, or liberties thereof, and become a freeman thereof.' The apprentice had to take an oath that at the time of the gift he was not worth, directly or indirectly, more than twenty pounds. No man was to receive the money twice and, if no apprentice should come forward, it was to be given to a servant-maid who had 'lived in good repute three years in one service, in a private family, not in an inn, a tavern or ale house'. As Parson foresaw, in time no apprentice came forward, and so, since 1909, the money has been given to the unsuccessful candidate for Maid's Money. Today the loser gets more than the winner: in 1974 the winner received £11.95 and the loser £12.09.
BRITISH CHARITY DOLES BEQUESTS Dicing the Maids Money. Guildford Surrey.
Dicing for Maids Money
GUILDFORD, SURREY. January, now takes place in May.

Miss Ellen Dovey and Miss Doris Ayres dice for Maids Money. Miss Dovey won following a tie on the first throw.

Guildford is fortunate in being the recipient of two benefactions. In his will,dated 29 January 1674, John How directed that the Mayor or magistrate of Guildford were to choose two poor servant-maids within the said town of good repute, who had served master or mistress two years together. They were to throw dice or cast lots as the mayor or magistrate directed. The maid with the highest score in a single throw was to be paid one year's clear profit of the premises so to be purchased.' For the purpose of buying premises he left £400 but by decree in chancery of 1728 the money was invested in South Sea Annuities and the interest ordered to be paid to the mayor. This is known as Maid's Money. To redress the balance in favour of the men, in an equally curious will of 3 July 1702, John Parson created Apprentices' Money. In his will he left £600 to the corporation of the town of Guildford to be disposed of by the mayor and magistrate of the town and the interest to be given annually to an apprentice. He stated that 'it should be given to a poor young man, who hath served an apprenticeship of seven years in the same town, or liberties thereof, and become a freeman thereof.' The apprentice had to take an oath that at the time of the gift he was not worth, directly or indirectly, more than twenty pounds. No man was to receive the money twice and, if no apprentice should come forward, it was to be given to a servant-maid who had 'lived in good repute three years in one service, in a private family, not in an inn, a tavern or ale house'. As Parson foresaw, in time no apprentice came forward, and so, since 1909, the money has been given to the unsuccessful candidate for Maid's Money. Today the loser gets more than the winner: in 1974 the winner received £11.95 and the loser £12.09.

Filename: Dicing for Maids Money GUILDFORD, SURREY ENGLAND BRITISH FOLK CUSTOMS 1970S ENGLAND .jpg
Source: Homer Sykes
Date:
Location: GUILDFORD SURREY
Credit: Homer Sykes
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Property Release: No
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Keywords:
  • Dicing for Maids Money
  • maids
  • maid's
  • GUILDFORD
  • SURREY
  • civic ceremony
  • town hall
  • Guildhall
  • dole
  • charity
  • Bequest
  • January
  • May
  • ENGLAND
  • BRITAIN
  • UK
  • BRITISH
  • ENGLISH
  • ARCHIVE STOCK
  • 1970s
  • 70s
  • Folklore
  • annual event
  • Folk custom
  • Ritual
  • My archive ref 9 713
  • 1974
  • No Spectators